Native American Proverbs (051-100)

Never see an old person going to carry water without
getting a bucket and going in their stead.
— Twana proverb

Trouble follows sin as surely as fever follows chill.
— Hopi proverb

Dreams are wiser than men.
— Omaha proverb

Never sit while your seniors stand.
— Cree proverb

Trouble no man about his religion — respect him in his views
and demand that he respects you.
— Shawnee proverb

Each person is his own judge.
— Shawnee proverb

May all my people find peace when they come in,
and leave with it when they go out.
— Comanche proverb

There is no death, only a change of worlds.
— Duwamish proverb

God teaches the birds to make nests,
yet the nests of all birds are not alike.
— Duwamish proverb

Poverty of heart is a noose that strangles humility
and breeds disrespect for man and nature.
— Dakota Sioux proverb

When there is true hospitality, few words are needed.
— Arapaho proverb

Everything the Power does, it does in a circle.
— Lakota proverb

One rain does not make a crop.
— Cree proverb

We give back thanks to our mother,
the earth that sustains us.
— Onondaga proverb

Even your silence holds a sort of prayer.
— Apache proverb

Never part from the chiefs' path, no matter how
short or beautiful the byway may be.
— Seneca proverb

Watch out for the man who says
nothing and the dog who does not bark.
— Cheyenne proverb

Do not judge your neighbor until
you walk two moons in his moccasins.
— Northern Cheyenne proverb

Misfortunes will happen to the
wisest and best of men.
— Pawnee proverb

To touch the earth is to have harmony with nature.
— Oglala proverb

Don't be afraid to cry. It will free your
mind of sorrowful thoughts.
— Hopi proverb

One finger cannot lift a pebble.
— Hopi proverb

What is life? It is the little shadow which runs
across the grass and loses itself in the sunset?
— Blackfoot proverb

Even when we lay down, we lay down
on our own path of life.
— Pawnee proverb

No answer is also an answer.
— Hopi proverb

We give thanks back to the Sun that has looked
upon the Earth with beneficial eyes.
— Onondaga proverb

Every bird loves to hear himself sing.
— Arapaho proverb

Not every sweet root gives birth to sweet grass.
— Pawnee proverb

We always return to our first loves.
— Umpqua proverb

Every fire is the same size when it begins.
— Seneca proverb

Not all danger comes with a warning.
— Cheyenne proverb

We are all one child spinning through Mother Sky.
— Shawnee proverb

Every animal knows more than you do.
— Nez Perce proverb

Not westward, but eastward
seek the coming of the light.
— Dakota proverb

We are all given our own song to sing.
— Ute proverb

Everyone who is successful must
have dreamed of something.
— Maricopa (Piipaash) proverb

Never get involved in someone's
decisions about his belongings.
— Hopi proverb

Those who do not honor the ways
of the Great Spirit, are not strong.
— Seneca proverb

I add my breath to your breath that we shall be as one people.
— Pueblo proverb

Show respect for all men, but grovel to none.
— Shawnee proverb

White men have too many chiefs.
— Nez Perce proverb

God is pleased to hear children pray.
— Osage proverb

Pray to understand what man has forgotten.
— Lumbee proverb

When you have learned about love, you have learned about God.
— Fox proverb

Everything has form, power, and inner meaning.
— Hopi proverb

One must learn from the bite of the fire to leave it alone.
— Teton Sioux proverb

What the people believe (perceive) is true is true.
— Anishinabe proverb

Even in Paradise, live all alone would be Hell.
— Seneca proverb

No one else can represent your conscience.
— Anishinabe proverb

We will be known forever by the tracks we leave.
— Dakota proverb

❖❖❖