English Proverbs (101-200)

The unknown is always great.

When one door shuts, another opens.

When things are at the worst they will mend.

Keep bad men company and you'll soon be of their number.

A scabbed horse is good enough for a scald squire.

One does harm, and another bears the blame.

Fatigue is better than a bed of down.

Few words are best.

Pride must abide.

He that cannot abide a bad market
deserves not a good one.

A rotten case abides no handling.

Much abides behind what a fool thinks.

Gentility without ability is worse than plain beggry.

Let the black sheep keep the white.

Age gives good advice when it is no longer
able to give a bad example.

That which does blossom in the spring
will bring forth fruit in the autumn.

No man is born wise.

Both together do best of all.

Much ado about nothing.

He who is about to marry should consider
how it is with his neighbors.

God is above law.

Everyone is a master and servant.

The stream can never rise above the springhead.

Love is above King or Kaiser, lord or laws.

The best horse needs breaking.

A saint abroad and a devil at home.

There is not often a fray without a broken head.

The absent party is still faulty.

Riches abuse them who know not how to use them.

Every man to his business.

A willow will buy a horse before an oak
will pay for a saddle.

A traveler may lie by authority.

Figures can't lie.

To cast oil in the fire is not the way to quench it.

Bed words find bad acceptance.

Money is ace of trumps.

A place for everything, and everything in its place.

Time and chance happen to all men.

Every heart has its own ache.

The best is best cheap.

Full pigeons find cherries bitter.

Age breeds aches.

He preaches patience that never knew pain.

He teaches ill who teaches all.

Sooner or later perseverance achieves.

Misfortunes come on wings and depart on foot.

A little bird is content with a little nest.

Have but few friends though much acquaintance.

Poverty makes us acquainted
with strange bedfellows sometimes.

Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows.

Forbearance is no acquittance.

Words can cut more than swords.

Better be up to the ankles,
than quite to over head and ears.

For mad words deaf ears.

A nod’s as good as a wink to a blind hose.

Truth is the daughter of time.

Every spark adds to the fire.

A handful of trade is an handful of gold.

Fraud and deceit are always in haste.

Vengeance, though it comes with leaden feet,
strikes with iron hands.

Fortune and love don't always favor the most deserving.

Dirty water will quench fire.

Wedlock is a padlock.

A man can do no more than he can.

He that stays does the business.

The fish adores the bait.

Praise is but the shadow of virtue.

One error always leads to another.

Love is the loadstone of love.

No evil without its advantages.

It pays to advertise.

While the discreet advise, the fool does his business.

The best is best to speak to.

Hedges have ears.

Eat not cherries with the great.

A light beginning, a heavy ending.

All things have an end, and a pudding has two.

What can't be cured must be endured.

Envy never enriched any man.

The first chapter of fools
is to esteem themselves wise.

The evil wound is cured, but not the evil name.

Sudden joy kills sooner than excessive grief.

Take heed is a fair thing.

The tree falls not at the first blow.

Better good afar off than evil at hand.

A thistle is a fat salad for an ass's mouth.

Flies come to feasts unasked.

The dead have few friends.

Two negatives make an affirmative.

An office that will not afford a man
his victuals is not worth two beans.

Wishes never can fill a sack.

Truth finds foes where it should find none.

When the heart is afire, some sparks will fly out of the mouth.

Water, fire, and soldiers quickly make room.

Who understands ill, answers ill.

Poor folk fare the best.

Threatened folks live long.

Some have been thought brave,
because they were afraid to run away.

There is no redemption from hell.

Scorn at first makes after-love the more.

❖❖❖

Index of English Proverbs