Fortune (101-125)

Man cannot be always fortunate;
flowers do not last forever.
— Chinese

Manners make often fortunes.
— English

Misfortune upon misfortune is not wholesome.
— French

Misfortune does not come with a bell on its neck.
— Estonian

Misfortune may turn out to be blessing.
— Korean

Misfortune draws misfortune in its train.
— African (Morocco)

Misfortune is the beginning of evil.
— Russian

Misfortune draws misfortune in its train.
— African (Morocco)

Misfortune rides into the villages,
but leaves them on foot.
— Swedish

Misfortune comes on horseback
and goes away on foot.
— French

Misfortune teaches us to pray.
— Slovak

Misfortune binds together.
— Yiddish

Misfortune is the beginning of evil.
— Russian

Misfortune seldom comes
alone to the house.
— Danish

Misfortune, wood, and hair grow every day.
— German

Misfortunes tell us what fortune is.
— English

Misfortunes find their way
even on the darkest night.
— Czech

Misfortunes, when asleep,
are not to be awakened.
— English

Misfortunes come on wings and depart on foot.
— English

Misfortunes do not come only to slaves.
— Ghanaian

Misfortunes never come singly.
— English

Misfortunes do not have set times for coming.
— Ghanaian

No fence against ill fortune.
— English

One man's curse is another man's fortune.
— Ghanaian

One misfortune shakes hands with another.
— Swedish

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