English Proverbs (3801-3900)

A shrew profitable may serve a man reasonable.

Thieves and rogues have the best luck,
if they do but scape hanging.

If the old dog bark, he gives counsel.

A rolling stone gathers no moss.

Rome was not built in a day.

He is poor indeed that can promise nothing.

One good head is better than a hundred strong hands.

Dogs bark before they bite.

A bad broom leaves a dirty room.

The highest branch is not the safest roost.

Idleness is the root of all evil.

Give him rope enough and he'll hang himself.

Every people has its prophet.

The rose proves a thorn.

Lips however rosy must be fed.

Money makes the old wife trot.

There is small choice in rotten apples.

Bastard brood is always proud.

The rough shell may have a good kernel.

A glutton is never generous.

Better believe it than go where it was done to prove it.

A small family is soon provided for.

Malice has a sharp sight and strong memory.

Idleness is the parent of all vice.

Virtue which parleys is near a surrender.

Industry pays debts, while despair increases them.

The sharper the storm, the sooner it's over.

A good horse should be seldom spurred.

The devil rides upon a fiddlestick.

Let the best horse leap the hedge first.

Today gold, tomorrow dust.

Talk is but talk.

Little mead, little need.

Little love, little trust.

Words are wind.

Pen and ink is wit's plough.

Liars should have good memories.

Mistrust is the mother of safety.

He that lives well, sees afar off.

Rate your commodities at home, but sell them abroad.

If wishes were horses beggars would ride.

A fool's bolt may sometimes hit the white.

The greatest barkers bite not sorest.

He that speaks lavishly shall hear as knavishly.

Milk the cow that stands still.

Sport is sweetest when no spectators.

Many words hurt.

Short reckonings are soon cleared.

The scalded cat fears cold water.

Hope is worth any money.

Good words and ill deeds deceive the wise and fools.

Praise at parting.

A man, a horse, and a dog are never
weary of each other's company.

A fortunate man may be anywhere.

A fair wife without a fortune is a fine house without furniture.

Two things do prolong your life:
a quiet heart, and a loving wife.

No man can do two things at once.

The bargain is ill made where neither party gains.

Scandal will rub out like dirt when it is dry.

Fortune may fail us, but a prudent conduct never will.

Nature is the true law.

Haste often rues.

It is a poor rule that will not work both ways.

Interest rules the world.

A running horse is an open sepulchre.

Trust not to a broken staff.

In wine there is truth.

A thousand probabilities do not make one truth.

A liar is not believed when he speaks truth.

Bad is a bad servant, but worse is being without him.

A small sum will serve to pay a short reckoning.

Apes are never more beasts than when they wear men's clothes.

Many wells, many buckets.

He that lives wickedly can hardly die honestly.

Luck will turn.

Words are wind.

He is wise enough that can keep himself warm.

Idleness makes the wit rust.

Old birds are not caught with chaff.

A word before is worth two behind.

The king's word must stand.

t\ The more haste, worse speed.

All wrong comes to wrack.

Money makes mastery.

A fasting belly may never be merry.

There's nothing like trying in this world.

The more you heap, the worse you cheap.

He that is welcome fares well.

The master's eye fats the horse.

Every man for himself and God for us all.

Policy goes beyond strength.

He goes far that never turns.

Soft pace goes far.

A joke never gains over an enemy,
but often loses a friend.

He that gets out of debt grows rich.

He helps little that helps not himself.

A golden dart kills where it pleases.

Who climbs high his fall is great.

Folly is wise in her own eyes.

God Man is a God to man.

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